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6 Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Grow at Home

6 Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Grow at Home

by Mallory Miles on

Perhaps your windowsill has boasted a variety of herbs sprouting from tea cups, or a pot of strawberries has flourished on your deck. While no one can complain about a fresh sprig of mint in their tea, don’t feel confined to these home gardening basics! Impress  your friends by exploring some of the lesser-known foods you can grow at home.

 Avocado

Avocado trees grown from an avocado pit don’t produce edible fruit, so you will want to invest in a dwarf avocado plant. Add sand or gravel to the bottom of a well-draining pot. Plant your tree in potting soil, and place it near a sunny window.

Water judiciously; avocado trees take up a lot of moisture, but too much moisture can create conditions for fungus and other disease. If the soil is moist, don’t water. If the soil is dry and crumbly, water.

Dwarf avocado trees can grow up to 12 feet tall, and the trees require one to two years before they bear fruit. But if you dream of out-of-this-world guacamole, having your own tree to produce fresh avocados might be worthwhile!

 Lemon

Unlike avocado trees, lemon trees grown from seeds are able to produce fruit, except might be waiting for 10 years before a tree grown from seed produces fruit. By that time, your tree may be 20 feet tall. If you’re not willing to commit a decade, consider purchasing a dwarf lemon tree, like the popular Meyer lemon.

Plant your tree in a well-draining pot with slightly acidic soil. Soil should be kept moist , but not soggy, at all times. To pamper your lemon tree, buy a mister to spritz its leaves. Lemon trees need lots of light, so if you lack a window with 12-hour access to sunlight, invest in a growing lamp for your little darling.

Then, when life gives you lemons, rejoice!

Mushrooms

Versatile, healthy, delicious, and easy, mushrooms can make wonderful home companions—provided that you have cultivated them deliberate. Because mushrooms grow from spores, rather than seeds.

The easiest way to start a mushroom garden is to order a mushroom kit. The kit will contain spores and medium for the mushroom to grow. Mushrooms thrive in moist, dark places, so avoid putting your mushroom garden by the window with all your other botanical beauties.

 Ginger

Ginger originated in Southeast Asia, so it may seem like a dauntingly exotic plant for you to grow in your own home. Luckily, that’s not the case.

Ginger is one of the easiest additions you can make to your home garden. Simply purchase a ginger root from a store, bring your root-baby home, and put it to bed in a pot of soil, with the freshest buds pointing up. Place the pot in indirect sunlight and keep the soil moist. When you need a bit of ginger, pull up the root and cut off a piece. Then, repeat the planting process.

Over time, you should see growth of the root, provided you don’t eat it all up first!

 Carrots

Carrots are most commonly grown from seeds, which means they are inexpensive and turn a yummy profit. To get long, classically beautiful carrots, select a growing container that is at least 18 inches deep, and fill it with humus-rich soil. Moisten the soil and plant the seeds about one inch apart and at a shallow depth.

Make sure that your carrots receive plenty of sunlight, and you should see sprouts within a week!

 Potatoes 

Most of us have been guilty of leaving a bag of potatoes in the cupboard too long and have witnessed the tenacity of these veggies sprouting. Just imagine the potato colony you could cultivate with a little love!

Fill a jar with water, cut the potato in half, and suspend it with toothpicks, so that some of the potato’s eyes are immersed in the water. Place the jar in the sun and replace the water if it gets cloudy.

After a week, you should see sprouts growing from the potato. Move your potato, sprout side down, into a well-draining pot and wait. After three to four months, your potato should have multiplied into a number of scrumptious offspring.

 


Mallory Miles

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1 comment


  • Nice! After this article I planted advocate at home, now I came back to read about mushrooms, because that is gonna be my next attempt.

    Felipe de Araujo on

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